Home > Posts > ABI Heros > Monster in the background: Epilepsy

National Epilepsy Week; a week to raise awareness of epilepsy, steps to take when someone has a seizure and the potential ramifications of regularly occurring seizures and the way that lives can be altered, changed and devastated by the effects of epilepsy as a condition.

I have agonized over this for the last few days, thinking how best to write a piece that would bring attention and raise awareness regarding epilepsy. Equally important, I have wondered how any words that I write down here can have an impact that may contribute to positive change that make day-to-day living with the condition of epilepsy any easier.

I have struggled with the idea of writing a rallying call, a way that if we all contribute we can improve the facilities, work environments and conditions as well as eliminate stigma and the negative connotations that are still attached to epilepsy. However, I came to a decision before I started writing today, that for me to attempt to write something as epic and revolutionary as that between one thousand and one thousand five hundred word in length would be a futile enterprise.

I intend merely to examine the effect of epilepsy on the lives of people and the issues that epilepsy has as a condition that prevent it from being both accommodated for in current society and for people who suffer from the condition to be assisted in their day-to-day lives while out and about.

Different , Unpredictable. Challenging.

The main issue I see with epilepsy is also a key one in identifying how it differs from other disabilities, neurological ones or otherwise. Specifically what I mean here is that the most prominent effect of the condition, when a person suffers a seizure, is not static. It is different from other disabilities in that sense. For example, with some sensory disabilities (let’s use blindness as an example), it is a static condition, since it is continuously lived with day after day. The condition very rarely worsens or improves but remains static, consistent. I suppose, in that same way disabilities such as paralysis are static and the lives that wheelchair users have to live are similar, in the sense that they rarely improve or worsen.

The point I am trying to make by using those two examples is not to try and get into a “who has it worse?” style, slanging match but merely to emphasise where I believe the differences in these disabilities and epilepsy are and I believe it to be very significant.

But what I am trying to get across is that there is a knowledge to both the victim of the disability and just as importantly to the outside world, what action can be taken and should be taken to aid people who suffer from these disabilities to live as full a life as possible while managing their disability as best they can with the help of family, friends and carers.

Many positive actions have been implemented to aid people in wheelchairs such as wheelchair accessible ramps and lifts to aid with staircases, adaptations to public transports such as accessibility ramps that can be lowered as well as sections of buses & trains they can sit in that allow room for their wheelchair with instructions on how and where to sit to keep them as safe as possible. Similarly there are the use of things such as tactile paving, sound based aids at road crossings and improved increased advertising regarding guide dogs to lead the blind.

When it comes to epilepsy though, I took a quote from the Epilepsy Society’s letter regarding applications for work and welfare, which I will be referring to throughout the remainder of this post:

“Epilepsy is a condition that poses unique challenges to those living with it and should be considered a ‘special case’.”

Epilepsy Society UK

A Special Case…

There are many aspects of epilepsy that make it” a special case” and make it a very challenging issue to deal with in terms of awareness and what aids can be provided in everyday life. Firstly, we as patients have to accept the fact that more often than not, the condition cannot really be explained: why we have it, what caused it and very often what the triggers for a seizure are. This is where that issue of a condition being static comes back into play.

When a seizure occurs in a patient it often happens at the most inappropriate time (then again I would say that there isn’t really an appropriate time for one to occur) and that for me, they come very often, out of the blue and with no warning with my seizures lasting a proximately two minutes and normally taking me 48 hours to recover from (I suffer from full on tonic-clonic seizures). Though some people do get warnings and know what triggers their seizures, giving them time to either get to a safe position or to avoid certain situations or places that would be likely to induce one. For some, seizures last for only 30 seconds.

Then there are what I have come to call absences (formerly “blips”, something I also suffered from), which are tiny seizures that last for a matter of second, maybe less, so that they are barely noticeable. Sometimes it even takes the patient a long time to realise that these absences of awareness and concentration are in fact mini-epileptic seizures (as was the case with me). It wasn’t until my early/mid-teens that the presence of these absences was realized and diagnosed.

The complexity and wide variety of seizure types, triggers and the effects they have on different people are the main obstacles in epilepsy being tackled or brought up within the current disability discourse, as the quote from the Epilepsy Society’s letter below suggests.

“Some people know their seizure triggers, making them easier to avoid. Some get a warning a few seconds or minutes beforehand, allowing them to get to safety before it develops. For most, seizures are unpredictable, a constant fear of what might happen and when.”

Epilepsy Society

The point is that epilepsy, as a condition is actually not fully understood, even by professionals. Obviously they know much and can help you to try and manage the condition. But the scale of epilepsy, its seizure types, manifestations and outcomes is so large, ever changing and unpredictable that to be able to aid the people who suffer from it who are walking down the street becomes almost an impossible task. As an example of the way that epilepsy evolves, I have started to have seizures during the night, while I sleep, a particularly dangerous type of epilepsy.

Even the same types of seizure affect different people in different ways and produce hugely different experiences.

There are over forty different types of seizure and even people with the same seizure type have very different experiences. It is not possible to generalize about the impact of epilepsy.” Epilepsy Society

So, is there an Answer?

I have to say that I am not as close to any decent answer or solution to tackle the issues that epilepsy presents. The thing that I would say is that if you or someone close to you suffers from epilepsy and seizures continue to occur regularly, firstly seek help from a professional. It could be that something as simple as a medication change could solve the issue ,as was the case with me (they changed my meds and I have not had a seizure for over three months, hooray!). But it could be that the seizures are brought on by the very nature of epilepsy and the things I have discussed above.

The unpredictability of this strange and terrible disability can have huge effects on a person’s confidence and state of mind. Sometimes epilepsy can feel like a monster that is stalking you, ever present in the background, sharpening its claws and waiting to pounce at the most inopportune moment. This feeling can be overwhelming seizures are uncontrolled. The key that I have found, even during those periods where the condition was uncontrolled, is to not let the condition rule me and dictate my life through fear and anxiety.

Because epilepsy does produce emotional and psychological effects that cannot be ignored or even acknowledged I would say. I realize that that is all well and good for me to say, but if we allow those feelings of fear and distress to overwhelm us it will only worsen the condition, turning the epilepsy into a cyclical condition.

As a final extract from the Epilepsy Society’s letter it explains how that works: “Seizures can be debilitating for the duration and for some time afterwards. Not knowing when a seizure will happen is disabling and can lead to fear, anxiety and isolation.” It then goes on to say that: “People with epilepsy can experience emotional and psychological effects on health. Memory loss, concentration problems, depression and anxiety all impact on seizure control, creating a vicious cycle.”

So, by ensuring that we are taking the correct medication in the correct dosages, with the help and support of family and friends to enable us to live a life where we can socialise, exercise, be creative and boost our confidence, we can contribute to managing epilepsy ourselves.

In my opinion, this will be a key aspect to living with epilepsy. All the evidence and everything I have listened to in the discourse surrounding disability in the UK suggests that it will be an impossible thing for society to accommodate for in terms of facilities. We need to make sure that this point is continually raised to ensure that epilepsy is included in discussion surrounding disability and treated as seriously as it deserves to be so that in the future as more is learned about the condition, facilities, services and accommodations can be made and put in place in society.

 

About the authorTom Massey

My life was changed for ever on the 30th of August 2009 when an attack on a night out left me with sever brain injuries. I was left in an induced coma after suffering fractures to the skull, bleeds on the brain, as well as severe bruising to the frontal lobes. Since the injury I have found it hard to find and keep work, to maintain relationships, and generally stay positive. I have decided to share all of my journey with you, in the hope we can bring brain injury awareness to the level it should be at. Please, follow my own WordPress blog Life After Brain Injury  to keep up to date with my brain injury journey! Follow me on Twitter:  @ABIBlogger

Tom Massey, ABI Blogger

 

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